Bell End and Rosedale in the North York Moors

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Lowland and Hill Walks
Aug 23
2020

20 people attending

0 places left

4 people waitlisted

Your price
£12.50
Event booking closes on Aug 23 at 10:00:00
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12 miles, approx 500m ascent, could be a hot day (or cold and wet)

Join Rob for a day exploring a bell end, a low bell end, a bell top, and if you can be bothered, industrial heritage and beautiful moorland landscapes.

This is a 12 mile (approx) circular walk from a popular North York Moors Inn. It takes in stunning moorland landscapes, which should include the very end of the heather flower season. We will walk on a disused mineral line around the head of Rosedale, and pass the derelict kilns and other buildings associated with the mining activity that took place here.

The area around Chimney Bank was the first part of Rosedale to experience the explosion of modern ironstone mining. Work began in 1856 and the initial mining was easy pickings as the ironstone stood out from the hillside as a cliff outcrop. Local legend says that during thunderstorms lightning would often strike the cliff and people talked of the devil or treasure buried in the hill.

Bank Top kilns were built to refine the ironstone through a process called ‘calcining’ – burning the ore with coal to reduce its weight by up to half and remove impurities. This meant much more efficient transport costs in getting to the ore to where it would be smelted into iron – first around Durham and later Teesside.

Once mining was underway in Rosedale large ironstone deposits were soon discovered on the east side of the valley too and extraction began here in 1860. The initial resources were plentiful, in seams up to 14ft thick, but the quality soon deteriorated and after several stops and starts mining finally left here, and all of Rosedale, in 1926. By then, around 11 million tonnes of ironstone had been taken from the valley and used in construction projects around the world.

A visit to Rosedale wouldn't be complete without visiting a bell end. It's so significant, it's marked on the Ordnance Survey map.

If it has reopened, we can stop for refreshments at the Inn at the end. All pics taken by the Leader and available for use by OutdoorLads anytime

 

Typical NYMoors dale
Rosedale, with views of the kilns on the far side
Rosedale sheep
Teaser for industrial heritage
Bit of artwork on local interpretation boards
Info about our walk
Typical NYMoors dale
Rosedale, with views of the kilns on the far side
Rosedale sheep
Teaser for industrial heritage
Bit of artwork on local interpretation boards
Info about our walk

Location

54.3947761, -0.9691533